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Why Hundreds and Thousands?

Hundreds and thousands.

When my family and I started to plan our travels to Edinburgh through the Fulbright Fellowship we became very interested in the many phrases that are different from one side of the ocean to the other.


For instance, in Scotland -

a trolley is a shopping cart

fizzy juice is soda

to chore is to steal

messages are grocery items


And most compelling for me:

Hundreds and thousands is the name for my favorite ice cream topping: sprinkles.

I have a deep rooted love for ice cream. I began working at an ice cream shop when I was 13 and continued through college. While that much time in close proximity to my favorite treat could spell trouble, the experience ultimately was the source of some of my fondest memories.


In my family, one needn’t consider eating ice cream if there are no sprinkles available to adorn it. They are the perfect topping to a most perfect dessert. And in my opinion, “Hundreds and thousands” their perfect name.


I hope this blog will become a collection of my Fulbright adventures that I can share with my friends and family back home, colleagues home and in the UK, and my fellow and future Fulbrighters. What brings me to the UK is not only the desire to study cultural and educational differences but to get a glimpse of how schools with similar challenges to my own are using innovative approaches to problem solving.


My inquiry project centers on rural arts education and what parallels might exist between rural schools in Scotland and in their U.S counterparts. My goal is to see how connecting rural students to their communities through project-based, applicable learning will not only strengthen their creative skills, but will also improve the creative economy of regions struggling with declining population and limited options. It will push students to be curious learners and engaged community members. Connecting students to their villages and towns - connecting the few to the many, or the hundreds to the thousands.




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© 2020 by Kari Giordano

The author of this publication/web site is a Fellow of the Fulbright Distinguished Awards in Teaching Semester Research Program, a program of the United States Department of State, administered by IREX. The views and information presented are the grantee's own and do not represent the U.S. Department of State, the Fulbright Program, or IREX